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Archive for the ‘Religion’ Category

Love

24 Jul

How long have these ladies been waiting, do you suppose?


Phyllis Siegel, 76, right, kisses her wife Connie Kopelov, 84, after exchanging vows at the Manhattan City Clerk’s office

Gay marriage went legal today in New York. Got friends there that I hope will join in — but not without serious and sane consideration, of course. I suspect these ladies have given it plenty of that.

For those of you that disagree with the concept, I give you my very favorite bible passage:

If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears. When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. But when I became a man, I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass, darkly; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.

And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

I started to emphasize several parts of this, but decided that the whole thing speaks for itself. This is just right.

 

Pray In Your Closet

28 Sep

One of the things about being an atheist, is that people think it’s a no-brainer. Like you just wake up one day and say “Hey, that church that my parents raised me in, the one that married and buried everyone in my family? I think I’ll skip it.” People who make a conscious decision to give up their faith have generally given it a lot more thought than those who blindly follow.

And now testing supports that.

If you want to know about God, you might want to talk to an atheist.

Heresy? Perhaps. But a survey that measured Americans’ knowledge of religion found that atheists and agnostics knew more, on average, than followers of most major faiths.

A majority of Protestants, for instance, couldn’t identify Martin Luther as the driving force behind the Protestant Reformation, according to the survey… Four in 10 Catholics misunderstood the meaning of their church’s central ritual, incorrectly saying that the bread and wine used in Holy Communion are intended to merely symbolize the body and blood of Christ, not actually become them.

Those are easy questions, of course, and you wonder how much harder they got, as the test progressed.

One interesting point is that Jews and Mormons scored just below atheists, and above Christians. So not only do they know more about Christianity than most Christians, but it also hammers home the fact that Christians know virtually nothing about Judaism or LDS, or any other religion, frankly. Nor do most of them seem remotely interested in learning, even though the Bible says you should always be seeking, in order to learn more about your own faith.

And they call us unknowing.

Read the whole thing… but with a grain of salt:

For comparison purposes, the survey also asked some questions about general knowledge, which yielded the scariest finding: 4% of Americans believe that Stephen King, not Herman Melville, wrote “Moby Dick.”

Hee. But also, yikes.

 
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