RSS
 

Archive for the ‘Lovely’ Category

Love

24 Jul

How long have these ladies been waiting, do you suppose?


Phyllis Siegel, 76, right, kisses her wife Connie Kopelov, 84, after exchanging vows at the Manhattan City Clerk’s office

Gay marriage went legal today in New York. Got friends there that I hope will join in — but not without serious and sane consideration, of course. I suspect these ladies have given it plenty of that.

For those of you that disagree with the concept, I give you my very favorite bible passage:

If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears. When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. But when I became a man, I put away childish things. For now we see through a glass, darkly; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.

And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

I started to emphasize several parts of this, but decided that the whole thing speaks for itself. This is just right.

 

Beauty in torment

11 Oct

The Nobel Peace Prize was given to someone who deserved it, last week — for perhaps the first time in decades. Liu Xiaobo is a true warrior for human rights and democracy, imprisoned in a country with less grasp of the concept than most.

I’m not normally a huge sap, but these words — written to his wife, Liu Xia, last year — damn near brought me to tears:

Your love is sunlight that transcends prison walls and bars, stroking every inch of my skin, warming my every cell, letting me maintain my inner calm, magnanimous and bright, so that every minute in prison is full of meaning. But my love for you is full of guilt and regret, sometimes heavy enough hobble my steps. I am a hard stone in the wilderness, putting up with the pummeling of raging storms, and too cold for anyone to dare touch. But my love is hard, sharp, and can penetrate any obstacles. Even if I am crushed into powder, I will embrace you with the ashes.

Given your love, my sweetheart, I would face my forthcoming trial calmly, with no regrets about my choice and looking forward to tomorrow optimistically.

Only the tiniest piece. Read the whole thing.

(via Hot Air)